The Alliance

20201hr 55minsR,

Four drug dealers call a truce and form an Alliance. But nothing good lasts forever, after 20 years of peace one member is forced to kill the others.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Users Reviews

  1. Januish Gomble

    I wouldn’t be on this website if I didn’t enjoy low/no budget films, but the lack of money has to be made up for by effort and passion and creativity. The first 10 minutes told me everything I need to know about the film. There is a typo (forver) within a minute which shows a lack of attention. The opening stick up scene is shot in a single, bland shot that seems to have been done entirely for simplicity’s sake and not for any creative or stylistic reason. It’s also the first of several key scenes in this crime/gangster film that are inexplicably shot in a library. If you need to shoot in a library because you have no money and it’s the only location you can get, give me an in-film reason why. A cameraman is prominently visible in a car side mirror. Footsteps and hands hitting tables make the camera wobble. Every line of dialogue has a tinny, echoey quality to it which suggests everything was just recorded with the camera’s own microphone, even if the person talking is on the other side of the room. I understand that microphones can be expensive, but to not even use very basic ones, or ADR the dialogue afterwards feels incredibly lazy. Hell, 75% of the film is people talking on phones, and so those phones could have been used to record the dialogue themselves. Scenes aren’t lit with anything other than the lights in the room, which leads to several key scenes where you can’t see the features on an actors face. Every dialogue scene is shot from a single shot between them, which means that even if you could see people’s faces, the shot’s too far away to read any emotion. And from a storytelling point of view, not a single shred of effort has gone into telling the audience who any of these people are. There are no allusions made in dialogue, no backstories offered, nowhere is a character forced to make a decision that illuminates who they are. These are all just 1 dimensional characters pointing toy guns at each other. A bunch of boys playing pretend. And why should an audience care about anything that happens to any of them? And in a film with this level of story, this level of character, and this little to say, to make it almost 2 hours long is an insult. As with anything that doesn’t have a budget, I commend them wholeheartedly for actually getting something made, but it’s so disappointing that with a modicum of effort and creativity, it could have been something a lot more worthwhile.

    1.0 rating

    I wouldn’t be on this website if I didn’t enjoy low/no budget films, but the lack of money has to be made up for by effort and passion and creativity. The first 10 minutes told me everything I need to know about the film. There is a typo (forver) within a minute which shows a lack of attention. The opening stick up scene is shot in a single, bland shot that seems to have been done entirely for simplicity’s sake and not for any creative or stylistic reason. It’s also the first of several key scenes in this crime/gangster film that are inexplicably shot in a library. If you need to shoot in a library because you have no money and it’s the only location you can get, give me an in-film reason why. A cameraman is prominently visible in a car side mirror. Footsteps and hands hitting tables make the camera wobble. Every line of dialogue has a tinny, echoey quality to it which suggests everything was just recorded with the camera’s own microphone, even if the person talking is on the other side of the room. I understand that microphones can be expensive, but to not even use very basic ones, or ADR the dialogue afterwards feels incredibly lazy. Hell, 75% of the film is people talking on phones, and so those phones could have been used to record the dialogue themselves. Scenes aren’t lit with anything other than the lights in the room, which leads to several key scenes where you can’t see the features on an actors face. Every dialogue scene is shot from a single shot between them, which means that even if you could see people’s faces, the shot’s too far away to read any emotion. And from a storytelling point of view, not a single shred of effort has gone into telling the audience who any of these people are. There are no allusions made in dialogue, no backstories offered, nowhere is a character forced to make a decision that illuminates who they are. These are all just 1 dimensional characters pointing toy guns at each other. A bunch of boys playing pretend. And why should an audience care about anything that happens to any of them? And in a film with this level of story, this level of character, and this little to say, to make it almost 2 hours long is an insult. As with anything that doesn’t have a budget, I commend them wholeheartedly for actually getting something made, but it’s so disappointing that with a modicum of effort and creativity, it could have been something a lot more worthwhile.